Entries in Youtube (2)

Tuesday
Aug092011

Dreaming of Tuscany: Savy Seasons by Liz

 

ALL IMAGES TAKEN FROM SAVY SEASONS BY LIZ; ALL VIDEO BY LIZREG4, VIA YOUTUBE

Wednesday
Feb092011

Youth Culture in the Bedroom 

▶ BRANDY: SITTIN' UP IN MY ROOM

▶ KATY PERRY: TEENAGE DREAM [DR. ROSEN ROSEN RX]

"As I have explored above, the teenage bedroom is an essential site of cultural consumption in the history of subcultures and is a site that has been revisited in more recent times to explore its continued influence and importance (Lincoln 2004,2005). A number of  significant differences can be drawn between the McRobbie-esque descriptions of the 1970s and '80s and the post-subcultural teenage bedroom of the '90s and '00s. Firstly, such private spaces are not just limited to use by teenage girls only. This is a space that is regularly engaged with by both teenage girls and teenage boys, and often used well into their 20s as a 'hub' of their social and cultural life. As part of the research conducted for my PhD (2003), it emerged that in fact even in McRobbie's time, boys also used this space, although this was not part of her commentary on bedroom culture."

"What is also significant about the contemporary teenage bedroom is that, particularly with the onset of new technologies such as the mobile phone and the internet, the public space of the 'streets' as discussed by Hall and Jefferson in relation to mod etc and the private sphere of the bedroom should not be considered in isolation from one another, that through 'zones' of activity (Lincoln 2004) the public and private are constantly overlapping, crossing over, merging and engaging. Activities in public space highly influence what may be going on inside the teenage bedroom, for example influencing what music to put on and which outfit to wear. This Hollands (1995) refers to as the 'going out ritual'."

"The teenage bedroom still retains some of its more traditional functions, recognizable from earlier discussions in this paper. It is a space in which to 'chill out' and escape from the public world of parents, peers and siblings. It is a space in which young people are able to shut themselves away from the trials of everyday life. It is a space in which to listen to music, with or without friends, to play video games, read books or magazines or chat on the phone. It also accommodates necessities such as doing homework. Finally, the space is representational, biographical in its nature inasmuch as it is one of the only spaces in the home that teenagers are likely to have a level of control over. In line with the post-subcultural thesis, what we see here is a space that is constantly evolving, constantly 'telling stories' about the life of the teenager who inhabits the space through its very content and through the posters, pictures, flyers, photographs etc that are selected as indicators of their cultural interest. What is so crucial about this is that teenage bedroom culture should not just be understood simply through the actions of teenagers within that space, but also through the space itself; their use of it and relation to it. This way we can understand the highly dynamic and multi-interpretable nature of the space."

"So as private space, one room in a house, it is multi-functional and its use by young people is highly individual, dependant on other social and cultural activities, mood etc, young people are most certainly active agents in its use. But much of this is primarily about the consumption of culture, what are the uses of the teenage bedroom as a site of production? There has been an 'academic buzz' recently around the impact that technologies are having on the shaping not only of city spaces and domestic spaces, but also 'personal' spaces too. Tia DeNora (2000) explores the role of music and listening through personal CD players and walkman's and the ways in which we use music on a daily basis as a 'soundtrack to our lives'. Bull too, leading on from his seminal work on personal stereos in 2000, considers the social significance of the Ipod in the creation of our own music-scapes (2005). Within the home more specifically, Rutter (2006) focuses on game cultures and the ways in which players become almost detached from their surrounding environment as they become more immersed in playing. Hodkinson and Lincoln (2006) explore the dimension of the 'online journal' as a site through which the personal space of the teenage bedroom and the private life of a young person can be extended into virtual realms. Lister (2003) coins the phrase 'techno-childhoods' to encapsulate the increasing emergence of technologies into young people's spaces."

ALL IMAGES TAKEN FROM TEENAGEBEDROOM.TUMBLR.COM; TEXT TAKEN FROM "BEYOND THE BEDROOM: REVISING 'SUBCULTURE' FOR TEENAGE PRIVATE SPACES", AS PUBLISHED IN TALKIE WALKIE BY DR. SÎAN LINCOLN, 2007; "SITTIN' UP IN MY ROOM" BY BRANDY; ALL VIDEOS VIA YOUTUBE