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Wednesday
Aug312011

First as Tragedy, Second as Farce: Charlott Markus 

Pygmalion; C-print, Edition 5, 2007

"In Ovid's narrative, Pygmalion was a Cypriot sculptor who carved a woman out of ivory. According to Ovid, after seeing the Propoetides prostituting themselves (more accurately, they denied the divinity of Venus and she thus ‘reduced’ them to prostitution), he was 'not interested in women', but his statue was so fair and realistic that he fell in love with it.

In time, Venus (Aphrodite)'s festival day came, and Pygmalion made offerings at the altar of Venus. There he quietly wished that his ivory sculpture would be changed to a real woman. When he returned home, he kissed his ivory statue and found that its lips felt warm. He kissed it again and touched her breasts with his hand and found that the ivory lost its hardness. Venus had granted Pygmalion's wish." [1]

13 (# of the least); C-print, 120 x 96 cm, Edition 3, 2008

 

"my perfection isn’t mine
you invented it

I am only the mirror
in which you preen yourself
and for that very reason
I despise you."

- Galatea Before the Mirror, Claribel Alegría, 1993 [2]

Pygmalion; C-print, Edition 5, 2007

Pygmalion; C-print, Edition 5, 2007

Pygmalion; C-print, Edition 5, 2007

ALL IMAGES BY CHARLOTT MARKUS, VIA THE ARTIST'S WEBSITE; TEXT [1] VIA WIKIPEDIA, TEXT [2] CITED IN CAPTION

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